The Balancing Act Between Activism and Journalism

Debate continues between journalists on whether you can produce a balanced story as an activist. By Nikitha Martins and Taesa Hodel  A photo of hundreds of people marching down Davie Street cheering and waving pride flags is displayed at the head of Charmaine de Silva’s Twitter profile. During de Silva’s time as assistant news director […]

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Women of the World

After Haiti’s devastating earthquake hit in January 2010, Daniele Hamamdjian touched down in the impoverished nation as part of the first international reporting team to tell the story. That story would change her life. An Ottawa-based parliamentary correspondent for CTV News at the time, Hamamdjian soon found herself walking along roads littered with tarp-covered bodies […]

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Priced Out of Vancouver

 To make it as a journalist these days is a struggle, no matter where you’re based or what you’re reporting on. The media industry is in turmoil, and good jobs are increasingly hard to hold on to. But for reporters living in Canada’s most expensive city, survival has become an even more precarious proposition—especially for […]

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Exposing Vancouver’s Real Estate Market

Real estate coverage in Vancouver has seen a large shift in recent years, with much credit going to local journalists who pushed for harder-hitting stories. Until as recently as two years ago, real estate in Vancouver was reported primarily as a by-the-numbers story. A handful of journalists—seeking a deeper understanding of how the industry works—started […]

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Standing Up For Students

Reporting on sexual assault can often be a difficult task, but for Canadian Press reporter Laura Kane, the impact her stories have had on how assaults are handled on college campuses makes it all worthwhile. Kane has written close to a dozen stories about campus sexual assault. Her reporting began in 2015 when Steven Galloway, […]

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Canadian Echo Chambers

Before the Internet, news in Canada was gleaned from sources that enjoyed a significant level of public trust. CBC, Global and CTV competed for the loyalty of TV watchers, CBC dominated the radio, while The Globe and Mail was Canada’s national newspaper. Then, in the 1990s, things started to change. The Internet began to enter […]

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Skipping the Middleman

Non-profit organizations have managed to carve out their own space in the journalism world by speaking directly to their audiences through self-published magazines. When it comes to storytelling, these magazines have a strong impact on interested readers while simultaneously benefitting the organization’s cause. Sarah Roth, president and CEO of the BC Cancer Foundation, has been […]

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Developing Photojournalism

Rapid advancements in camera technology in the last two decades have transformed the role of the photojournalist. In 1994, the first digital press camera became available: The Associated Press NC2000, by Nikon, which was developed alongside Kodak. When initially released, the NC2000 sold for around $17,000. Compared to the size of a modern DSLR, the […]

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The Golden Era of Journalism

Media in Canada is changing every day, and according to reporter Ian Gill, we’re on the cusp of a golden era of journalism­—despite all evidence to the contrary. Gill moved to Vancouver from Australia in the 1980s, and worked for the Vancouver Sun for seven years, followed by several years as a television reporter for […]

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