Party of One

The modern journalist is expected to know the ins and outs of all aspects of the trade. The ability to interview, write, photograph and edit is now mandatory in today’s industry, partly due to shrinking newsrooms and the reduction of journalists specializing in one field or another. Samantha Anderson is the editor of the Cloverdale […]

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A Change of Pace and Direction

The mounting pressure on the journalism industry has made some reporters decide to set down their notebook and pen and switch over to communications and public relations work. Whether it’s for the sake of a career change or to escape the relentlessness of the newsroom, journalists switching into communications are part of a growing trend. […]

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Chirping Online

The days of grabbing newspapers hot off the press are dwindling. While traditional media outlets might still be the primary news source for many people, Twitter has become a key player in breaking stories. The online site has become the go-to platform thanks to its ability to share content instantly, and while immediacy is a […]

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Reading Between the Lines

When a company wants publicity, it often works with a public relations firm on a press release. Many journalists—pressed for time and facing decreased newsroom resources—rely on these releases to tell their story. The symbiotic relationship between public relations and journalism presents both risks and opportunities. Press releases represent a gold mine of information for […]

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Developing Photojournalism

Rapid advancements in camera technology in the last two decades have transformed the role of the photojournalist. In 1994, the first digital press camera became available: The Associated Press NC2000, by Nikon, which was developed alongside Kodak. When initially released, the NC2000 sold for around $17,000. Compared to the size of a modern DSLR, the […]

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The Golden Era of Journalism

Media in Canada is changing every day, and according to reporter Ian Gill, we’re on the cusp of a golden era of journalism­—despite all evidence to the contrary. Gill moved to Vancouver from Australia in the 1980s, and worked for the Vancouver Sun for seven years, followed by several years as a television reporter for […]

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